Big Mac inventor passes away-Deep Creek Lake News

Big Mac inventor passes away-Deep Creek Lake News
Deep Creek Lakes Favorite Real Estate Agent
Big Mac inventor passes away-Deep Creek Lake News
Taylor-Made Real Estate Betsy Spiker Holcomb-301-616-5022
Big Mac inventor passes away-Deep Creek Lake News
Michael “Jim” Delligatti 8/2 1918-11/28/16

Most locals know the man and the story about this very successful businessman. Michael “Jim” Delligatti who established Uno’s, The Honi Honi Bar, Garrett 8 Cinemas, and Arrowhead Market was a well-known fixture here at Deep Creek Lake. His claim to fame, which has reached far around the world, is the invention of the Big Mac sandwich at McDonald’s. We have all enjoyed our share of this famously delicious burger that revolutionized the fast food world. Mr. Delligatti opened his first McDonald’s restaurant in 1957 and branched out 47 more franchise stores over the next two decades. Competing against the large sandwich offerings of Big Boys and Burger King, Mr. Delligatti proposed a new sandwich called simply the Big Mac! McDonalds executives didn’t receive the idea well at first but eventually got the green light to pilot the sandwich in the Uniontown market in 1967. The rest is history!

Big Mac inventor passes away-Deep Creek Lake News

The residents here at the lake have immense respect for the Delligatti family and were saddened by the news of his passing in late November. Remember the next time you dig into a Big Mac the interesting story of the man behind its creation.Big Mac inventor passes away-Deep Creek Lake News

Deep Creek Lake Celebrates 91 Years

Betsy Spiker Holcomb Deep Creek Lakes Favorite Realtor
Betsy Spiker Holcomb, Deep Creek Lake’s Favorite Realtor
Deep Creek Lake Celebrates 91 Years
Speed boat mode!!

Deep Creek Lake Celebrates 91 Years. Deep Creek Lake is coming up on its 91st anniversary of existence!  Maryland’s largest freshwater lake is loved by many and has an interesting history.  Deep Creek Lake encompasses about 3900 acres with 65 miles of shoreline.  This man-made lake got its start in 1925 as the result of an effort undertaken by the Youghiogheny Hydro Electric Corporation to harness the power of the Youghiogheny River. A 1300-foot-long impoundment dam was constructed to stem the flow of water. Thousands upon thousands of trees were removed from the area to be flooded and 15 miles of primary and secondary roads were relocated. It was estimated that it would take close to 6 months to fill the new Reservoir but heavy rains and snowfall quickened the process to only a couple of months.

Deep Creek Lake Celebrates 91 Years
Deep Creek Lake Dam

On May 26th 1925, the hydroelectric plant kicked in the service with water from the lake transported to a Powerhouse through a 7000-foot tunnel. A remarkable feat at the time. Although the lake was constructed originally to harness energy it has become Maryland’s favorite recreational lake for fishing, boating and plane ole relaxing. The lake is responsible for transforming the economy and quality of life here to all Garrett County residents and the many thousands of visitors and homeowners who call this place home. The lake is an economic engine for Garrett County spurring growth in the tourism industry and generating millions in property tax revenue. In the heat of summer, it is estimated that we see half a million visitors that enjoy the area. Through its many personalities of the past, Deep Creek Lake has evolved into a place where families create and retain lifetimes of memories.

Deep Creek Lake Celebrates 91 Years
Deep Creek Lake
Deep Creek Lake Celebrates 91 Years
Get lost at Deep Creek
Deep Creek Lake Celebrates 91 Years
Fishing Deep Creek Lake

Drane House-Garrett County’s Past

Betsy Spiker Holcomb Deep Creek Lakes Favorite Realtor
Betsy Spiker Holcomb, Deep Creek Lake’s Favorite Realtor

Drane House-Garrett County’s Past

 

Drane House-Garrett County’s Past
The Drane House, Accident Maryland

The Drane House Garrett County’s Past. I took a ride on an unusually warm winter day just a few miles outside of Deep Creek Lake to the historical Drane House in sleepy Accident, Maryland. Garrett County’s past is vast and the Drane House plays an important role being the oldest building standing. Continue reading Drane House-Garrett County’s Past

Einstein visits Deep Creek Lake Maryland in 1946

Betsy Holcomb

Einstein visits Deep Creek Lake Maryland in 1946

 

Deep Creek Lake had a brief relationship with one of the world’s most incredible minds in September, 1946. Einstein has been associated with the making of the atomic bomb, something that he indeed had come up with in theory, but did not implement as a war weapon; he was at heart a pacifist.  Let’s put this into context as to what was happening prior to his visit.  The atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan just about a year before his visit to Deep Creek Lake. This was something that weighed heavy on him as he was pictured on the cover of Time magazine in front of a mushroom cloud. I don’t think it was ever his intention to unleash such a destructive act on humanity and his visit to Deep Creek lake fell into the area of his life when he had to reflect on the weight of bombings on mankind.

Einstein Deep Creek Lake

Besides getting out of the spotlight, he also had Dr. Tom Wilson examine him for an aneurysm of the aorta of the abdomen.  Einstein stayed at Dr. Wilson’s lake cottage for his two-week vacation and was seen taking daily walks with his dog around the cottage vicinity. He was seen talking to strangers who had no clue who he was.  Dr. Wilson hired Blair Thompson, as attendant for Mr. Einstein, under the orders to make sure he had everything he needs. Blair noted that he felt at ease around him and that he was a very nice man.  Blair witnessed Mr. Einstein fishing, although he never caught anything. He also had an interest in watching birds and squirrels through his binoculars. He also had some sailing experiences that we are lucky enough to have captured by photograph. Mr. Einstein would sail with a friend or go alone and he noted that you can get nearer to God at the lake. He also told Blair Thompson that the rainstorms at the lake had a way of cleansing the air. Mr. Einstein, on his departure, kindly gave Mr. Thompson a $50 bill in an envelope that he had signed at the top corner.  Mr. Thompson had planned to save this special and historical signature but through the years lost track of it yet he still remembers the fond memories associated with his visit.

Einstein Deep Creek Lake

You don’t have to be a nuclear physicist to understand why people are seduced into the solace of Deep Creek Lake, as its brings out the calmness on your existence itself.

Einstein Deep Creek Lake

Einstein Deep Creek Lake

Casselman River Bridge State Park

 Betsy Holcomb

Casselman River Bridge State Park

Casselman Bridge

 Casselman Bridge

Casselman River Bridge State Park is a 4-acre parcel located east of Grantsville in Garrett County on U.S. Route 40. It is a popular area for fly fishermen, photographers, and history enthusiasts. When the 80-foot span was erected in 1813, it was the longest single span stone arch bridge in the United States. Skeptics predicted that the bridge would collapse once the supporting timbers were removed – yet the bridge stood, serving as an important link on the National Road from 1813 to 1933. Although the bridge no longer carries vehicular traffic, it is open to pedestrians.

CM6

CM2

Today the Casselman River Bridge stands as a picturesque relic of Maryland’s early transportation history, and a tribute to those who designed and built the National Road. To the east of the bridge is the “Spruce Forest Artisan Village.” The village’s historic buildings were moved from various locations in Western Maryland and restored on the site. They currently serve as studios for a variety of artists. Adjacent to Spruce Village are the Penn Alps restaurant and gift shop, a historic structure that dates to 1818, and Stanton’s Mill, a working grist mill originally established in 1797.

Casselman Bridge

Casselman Bridge

Park Features

  • Picnicking – Several picnic tables are available on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Fishing – the Casselman River is a popular spot for fly-fishing. Please check the current Maryland Fishing Guide for special regulations.
  • Restroom – There is a waterless restroom for visitor use.
  • Alcohol Policy – Alcohol is not permitted anywhere in Casselman River Bridge State Park.
  • Casselman River Bridge State Park is handicapped-accessible, featuring a paved walkway from the parking lot to the bridge, and an accessible picnic site, parking area, and restroom.

Continue reading Casselman River Bridge State Park

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Festival of Trees

Betsy Holcomb

 

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Festival of Trees. GarrettCounty is home to some very talented artisans.  One of these individuals is local Luthier Roger Skipper, who builds amazing first class guitars, violins, mandolins, banjos, ukuleles, dulcimers, dobros, and stand up basses. Anyone who plays a string instrument will most certainly appreciate his incredible work.  Each instrument is visually a work of art with custom detailed inlays from the headstock to the bindings.

 

Looking good is one thing, but the sound that these instruments make is nothing short of stellar. I stopped by his shop the other day and met two musicians from the Pittsburgh Symphony who have bought a total of 10 instruments from him so far. A violinist has bought two violins and has been inspired to buy two mandolins and ukuleles and is learning how to play bluegrass from Roger (who plays all the instruments he makes).

 

Roger just buffed out an acoustic dreadnought style guitar that day and we all took a turn playing this wonderful guitar. It was the most amazing sounding instruments I have ever heard. Don’t follow the hype of big builders who mass produce “famous” styles. Get Roger to build you an amazing custom instrument that you will cherish for your lifetime..  Email Roger at rskipper2@verizon.net and tell him The Spiker Team referred you. You will not be sorry!  Also check out his website which is under construction. Skipper Strings. Here is a photo of the handcrafted sunburst dreadnought that is currently for sale.

erre

Other handy work…

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Festival of TreesGreetings from Deep Creek Lake-Festival of Trees

 

Coming up in Deep Creek on November 29th & 30th is the Festival of Trees, a fundraiser for the DoveCenter. Bring the kiddo’s and let them meet Santa Claus at the breakfast celebration between 9am-10am on both Friday and Saturday. Don’t miss the silent action for a great deal on some unique items.

 

The Honi also has their Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony on November 30th from 7:00-8:00PM.  Events include: Christmas Carols, Kids and Pet Photos with Santa Claus, FREE Hot Chocolate and live band entertainment by the Remedy from 8-11pm.

 

There still continue to be a good amount of real estate settlements taking place.  This is a good sign that sales will continue to pick up in 2014.  These properties have recently had price reductions, indicating that the seller’s may have good motivation to sell: http://mrislistings.mris.com/DE.asp?ID=55054075329.

 

Have a great week and think snowJ!  (I hear we may be getting more of it later in the week.)

 

 

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Winter-Veterans Day-Real Estate

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Winter-Veterans Day-Real Estate

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Winter-Veterans Day-Real Estate . There are very few things we can predict in life and weather would certainly be one of those!  Our temperatures here have been rising and plummeting from day to day, which is pretty typical for this time of year.  I know many of us would just as well have snow so that we can enjoy its beauty but we will have to patiently wait for Mother Nature to run its course and bless us with such.  If you haven’t done so already, now is a good time to secure your season pass at Wisp Resort.  You will not want to wait in line to get it once the slopes open!

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Winter-Veterans Day-Real Estate

 

As we transition towards winter, remember that docks have to be out of the water by December 1st and can be returned to the water no earlier than April 1st.  They like to make sure all objects are out of the water before the lake freezes.  Our snowmobiles are begging for a frozen lake this year!  The last few winters, the temperatures haven’t been consistently cold enough for the lake to freeze to the point where I’m comfortable riding the water.  We saw a few brave enthusiasts out there last year but we were not one of them!

 

                        Griffin enjoyed his first office Halloween party, especially due to the fact that Mommy allowed him to taste a few of the homemade dishes.  I’m not sure he was digging the costume, however!  I’ll have to do a better job shopping for one next year.

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Winter-Veterans Day-Real Estate

 

Event wise, we are kind of in a lull but there will be some upcoming winter events over the next month that we’ll be sure to tell you about.  There is, however, a Veteran’s Day Parade in Oakland at 10:00 on Monday, November 11th.  This is something I wasn’t even aware but now that I am I’ll have to check it out for myself.  What a great way to honor those who’ve served our country!

 

The Betsy Spiker Holcomb Team’s featured listings for the week are a contemporary home in RedRunHeights, a waterfront home site on Stockslager Road and a Lincoln Lodge on Mayhew Inn   Road:

http://vt.realbiz360.com/Listing-1032448.html

http://vt.realbiz360.com/Listing-996596.html

http://vt.realbiz360.com/Listing-1464279.html

 

These are the last 15 sales to take place at Deep Creek/Garrett County and you will see that the sales prices are getting closer to the asking prices: http://mrislistings.mris.com/DE.asp?ID=54937273874.  Remember that we have an auto email service that we provide that will email you listings within your specific search criteria as soon as they hit the market.  If you are not already setup on this service and would like to be please let us know.

 

A thought from Napoleon Hill for your weekend…Don’t wait. The time will never be just right.

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Swallow Falls-Moonshadow Cafe-Halloween

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Swallow Falls-Moonshadow Cafe-Halloween

 

Weekly updates by Betsy Spiker Holcomb of Taylor-Made Vacations and Sales, Deep Creek Lake. As you already know, I never get tired of singing the praises of Swallow Falls State Park. This weekend we did the loop hike and met some really fun visitors from Baltimore and Northern Virginia. Even after the damaging “Sandy” storm we still see a solid stand of ancient hemlock trees towering over the forest. For some visitors, it was their first glimpse of the awesome aura put off by these majestic trees that stand guard over the powerful Youghiogheny River. We finished our hike, as always, at the calming Tolliver Falls. The water is flowing at a slow and tranquil pace which makes the falls even more calming and was apparent by the group of people entranced by the sights and sounds of this special nook of the park.
Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Swallow Falls-Moonshadow Cafe-Halloween

Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Swallow Falls-Moonshadow Cafe-Halloween

 

 

Fall golfers…Be advised that the Oakland Country Club is having a late season special until the end of the month. Bring a foursome of golfers and play for $100.00 with a cart Monday-Thursday, $25 a head! Wow, you’d think we are still in the 80’s!

 

New restaurant alert! As you pass through the town of Accident on the way to Deep Creek Lake you will notice a re-opened cafe on the right across from the car dealership called The Moonshadow Café & Bar. The food is all local – from the meats, cheeses and vegetables. With less than a week under its belt, it has become the talk of the town so don’t miss giving it a try next visit. FYI, this Friday is a Halloween Party if you like to play dress up.

 

Speaking of Halloween parties, Deep Creek Lake has THE costume party at the lake!!  Black Bear Tavern and Restaurant has long been the go-to place for the ghouls and goblin lovers as they pull in all the folks from in and out of town who like to get dressed up and dance the night away. If you have a will to be weird and fun, then make a special trip and take on your favorite Halloween character. Tell the owners Laura and Barry Clapsaddle hello.

 

Bob and I a few years back…Beauty and the Beast!

 Greetings from Deep Creek Lake-Swallow Falls-Moonshadow Cafe-Halloween

 

From the real estate front, the September market numbers are all up versus a year ago, as you will see on the attached report.  We have two featured listings this week.  First, is a quaint home in a lush, garden setting with a large, open main level and a 3-car garage and a Price Reduction http://vt.realbiz360.com/Listing-1032448.html.  Also, we just listed a great lakefront home site on Stockslager Road with 135’ of waterfront and a Type A dock permit http://mrislistings.mris.com/DE.asp?ID=54711201519.

 

Now is a great time to look at real estate.  With the fall season winding down and snow on the way (yes, this week!!) fewer of our homes are booked making it easy to show them with a moment’s notice.  Enjoy your week!

 

 

 

 

Deep Creek Lake History-How was McHenry Maryland named?

Deep Creek Lake History-How was McHenry Maryland named?
Betsy Spiker Holcomb Deep Creek Lakes favorite Realtor

Deep Creek Lake History-How was McHenry Maryland named?

DID YOU KNOW?

Deep Creek Lake History-How was McHenry Maryland named?

Dr. James McHenry, Secretary of War during the administrations

of Presidents Washington and Adams, purchased

almost 1,000 acres in the Buffalo Marsh area

which is today known as Marsh Run Cove or McHenry

Cove. After James and his son William died, a nephew,

John McHenry, moved to the Buffalo Marsh property.

After the death of John and his wife, the land passed

through many hands but today we know the area as

McHenry.

Deep Creek Lake History-How was McHenry Maryland named?

 

Maryland in the War of 1812-A Living Historical Event

Maryland in the War of 1812-A Living Historical Event

 

Maryland in the War of 1812-A Living Historical Eventtay

The Short History of the War of 1812 in Maryland 

John Miller

Maryland in the War of 1812-A Living Historical Event.The most forgotten war in America’s history is the War of 1812. Overshadowed by the Napoleon’s War in Europe, the War of 1812 today is a forgotten war. Although the major campaigns were fought in the Great Lakes and Canadian region, a campaign was launched by the British that focused on our nations newly formed capital city of Washington during the late summer of 1814.

On June 18, 1812 the United States declared war on Great Britain. The reasons for a war was because the Royal Navy was boarding US ships and taking back English escaped sailors. William Cobbet an Englishman said “They seemed to be wanting just such a war as this to complete the separation of England from America; and make the latter feel that she had no safety against the former but in the arms of her free citizens.” During the beginning of the War of 1812, the American territory was penetrated at three different points, by way of Lake Champlain, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Mississippi.

The British began an offensive campaign of capturing Washington in the summer of 1814. With much speculation of invasion, the Americans began construction of earth works on Fort McHenry by winter of 1813 to initiated preparations for a defensive campaign. The final year of the War of 1812 was distinguished by a greater invasive vigorous British force than what had earlier distinguished them.

As preparations on the Chesapeake were carried out, Captains Michael Sluss, Jacob Row, and Privates Michael C. Adelsberger, James Storm, Felix B. Taney, Jesse Nusseur, John Wetzel, and Peter Remby were all men from the Emmitsburg area, who joined the Maryland Militia to help defend Baltimore and Washington from the threat of a possible British infringement. Although Emmitsburg was a forgotten footnote in American history, the Toms Creek area became famous due to one individual, named Francis Scott Key.

Francis Scott Key (son of General John Ross Key) was born on August 1, 1779, in western Maryland on the family estate outside of Tom’s Creek called Terra Ruba. He was the son of an established Maryland family, and attended grammar school at Annapolis when he was 10 years old. At the age of 17, he graduated from St. Johns College in Annapolis and moved to Frederick, Maryland. He became a lawyer in Frederick until he moved to Georgetown. By 1805 he had established in law practice in Georgetown, Maryland and became one of the best lawyers in Washington. Francis Scott Key was a religious man and was involved in the Episcopal Church. Although opposed to the war, he served for a brief period with the Georgetown Light Field Artillery.

During the Battle of Bladensburg, Key was assigned of giving out field positions to the American troops. As the British began preparations to attack Fort McHenry, Francis Scott Key was taken into captivity while arranging Dr. Beans’ release and witnessed the British bombardment of Fort McHenry in the Baltimore Harbor. He often wrote poems and the sight of the American flag still flying over the fort at daybreak inspired him to write the poem entitled “The Star-Spangled Banner,” which he set to the tune of an old English drinking song called, “To Anacreon in Heaven.

President James Madison warned his cabinet that he expected the British to attack Washington. The president then selected General William Winder to command a newly created Tenth Military District that covered Maryland, Northern Virginia, and the District of Columbia.. With much debate with the number of troops he had in his command, he could not order the defenses of Washington to be reinforced by additional troops until there was imminent danger.

August 24, was a day that America would rather forget. It was this day that Bladensburg was fought and is when Washington was taken by the British. During the morning, the British had marched for seven miles to Bladensburg. The British army still felt the swaying of the sea in their knees and the hot weather forced some of the soldiers dropped dead in their tracks. As British approached Bladensburg, the danger became more than threatening, as they clashed for three hours with a much stronger American force. The tired soldiers of the British came onto the field without their Sharpshooters. The Americans thought how strange for the British to engage without support of their Sharpshooters. The Americans had thought a quick victory was at hand.

The defenses on the American right flank consisted of the Baltimore Artillery, who was entrenched on a knoll over looking the bridge that the British had to use. The Secretary of State James Monroe had arrived on the field and helped changed General Tobias Stansbury’s deployments giving the Americans a chance for victory. General Stansbury’s command fired a massive volley at the on coming British allies under Duke Wellington, as they began to scatter.

Seeing the British approach and the deployment of their artillery the Baltimore artillery held off the British. As the British began to charge the bridge, Colonel Thornton gave the order to his command to charge. The Baltimore artillery had no chance to fire the oncoming British as Colonel Thornton’s early charge did not allow them time to weaken the army. The British seeing the American advance, the red coats hurried as they placed their three cannon and began to fire at the defenses of the Americans. As the British engaged Colonel Thornton’s small army, they began to break through.

The British soon advanced on Colonel Wadsworth’s Baltimore Artillery, seeing the British charge, Wadsworth gave the command “load” as the Americans mistakenly placed the wadding in the barrel of the cannon, before placing the charge of powder, and this left the Americans fleeing, leaving both cannon behind. The 5th regiment was ordered to support the Baltimore Artillery; soon they were repulsed as rockets flew in the air. The British with three cannon and the Congreve Rocket petrified the militia as they broke and fled after a few volleys were fired. The right of the American army began to splinter, as General Winder pleaded with these men not to retreat and advance the British. The whole right flank of the American army started to retreat. Out of 1350 men the Americans had only fifty stayed and fought before they to retreated. The Americans were breaking giving the National Turnpike to the British, as the militia was in full flight as they were insufficiently trained to withdraw in good order. At this point private Henry Fulford quoted “Our main objective was to flee from the British and head to a near by swamp.”

The Americans received reinforcements from Commodore Joshua Barney and 400 sailors and marines who arrived at Bladensburg and formed the third line of battle. The sailors and the marines held as long as they could while the Americans retreated. The only defense of the Americans had to slow the British advance on Washington, was a battery of five naval cannon. Only the sailors and marines held firm, but the British eventually maneuvered around them. Commodore Joshua Barney and his battalion were the only Americans to gain credit for the day. President Madison was tracking down the Secretary of War to find out what steps were in the works to meet the final British assault, he was shocked and disheartened to find out there was no plan. By 4:00 P.M. the Battle of Bladensburg was over, it had lasted three hours.

The position of American troops at Bladensburg was improperly coordinated. General Winder himself contributed to the defeat by ordering the militiamen to retire before they were properly deployed. The battle of Blandensburg became known as “The Bladenburg Races.” After a few hours rest the British formed up and continued on toward Washington.

By dusk, the British approached the heart of Washington bearing a flag of truce and demanded surrender. Suddenly from a house window the flag of truce is fired upon. The British troops rushed into the house where the shots had been fired from, and put all who were found in the house to the sword and then reduced the house to ashes. They went onto burn and destroy every building connected to the government. This was a major embarrassment to our nation, which resulted disastrously to the Americans as important historical landmarks and official government documents were destroyed. The British stayed in Washington for two nights as the city laid in agony. The weather had turned for the worst, as a storm made landfall. Not knowing when the broken American army would try and retake Washington, the British to abandon Washington the next night.

Early September, after their success in Washington, the British decided to follow up with an attack on Baltimore. This city was an attractive target not only because it was a large commercial center and an important base for privateers but also because it was such a hotbed of algophobia. On the afternoon of September 11, General John Stricker of the American army marches out of Baltimore toward North Point with 3,200 men. That evening he encamped seven miles from the city near the Methodist-meeting house. The next morning a British force of 5,000 landed at North Point under the command of General Robert Ross and Admiral George Cockburn.

At 7 A.M. on September 12, General Stricker receives word of the British landing and orders all baggage to the rear, while he arranges his brigade into three defense lines at the narrowest point between the Patapsco and Back Rivers. At noon the two forces met and a brief skirmish erupts. During the skirmish, British General Ross was killed. The command was then given to Colonel Arthur Brooke. Colonel Brooke brings up the Light Infantry and Rocket Batteries and encounters General Stricker’s 3rd Brigade. Unable to hold his left flank against a British flanking assault, he orders an orderly fallback to the defenses of Baltimore City on Hampstead Hill. By 4 p.m. General Sticker the burning of a large ropewalk (a long, low building used for manufacturing rope for ships), creating “a very brilliant light” that temporarily causes panic in Baltimore. British warships began to sail up the river to take position two miles from Fort McHenry.

By 5:30 A.M. on September 13, the British warships commence the bombardment of Fort McHenry, their artillery quickly replied. British warships then move and anchor out of range from the fort’s cannon. While on land at north Point, the British push forward and try to out flank the American right, but is countered. As the British return to their former position east of Hampstead Hill, Colonel Brooke considers a frontal assault at midnight upon the American left flank. If he would pursue this plan, he would need the British navy to distract the Americans. As the British continued to attack Fort McHenry, a British mortar shell make a direct hit on Bastion Number 3 dismounting a 24-pound cannon and killing Lt. Levi Claggett and Sergeant John Clemm of the Baltimore Fencibles.

The British, believing they had executed severe damage, moved nearer to the fort. With the British ships now within range of the fort’s guns, the American defenders respond with all available guns, scoring several hits. As the land battle of North Point was underway, Colonel Brooke receives a message from the Vice Admiral that the ships cannot lend support to his assault because sunken vessels and the extensive American shore batteries block the channel. The British intend to engage the western shore batteries and create a diversion in hopes of pulling the Americans from Hampstead Hill to support the threat on Fort McHenry and the backdoor of their defenses, favoring an assault by Brook’s forces on Hampstead Hill.

The British continued their march to Baltimore. After getting within sight of the cities defenses, the British decided to turn back because they could not lure the Americans out from their defensive works. Meanwhile Cohchrane had brought up his bomb and rocket ships to attack Fort McHenry. Major George Armistead stood with 1000 men to defend the fort. Cohcrane wanted to silence the guns of the fort so that he could bring in the smaller ships and then weaken the American lines.

As midnight approached the British flotilla proceeds with its diversionary plan up the Ferry Branch, Colonel Brooke has already decided to withdraw the Army and return to their shipping at North Point. Brooke’s decision would not reach the Navy in time to cancel the Ferry Branch offensive. The American defenders at Forts Covington and Babcock discover the British flotilla offshore and open crossfire on the barges. Two barges are sunk. After the bombardment, Fort McHenry ceases its fire against the British ships. By 7 a.m. the next morning, the British cease-fire and begin to withdraw. As the last British ship sails down river, Fort McHenry raises the Star-Spangled Banner over the ramparts. That evening, a small cartel vessel passes Fort McHenry and docks at Fells Point and on board is Francis Scott Key.

The British bombardment of Fort McHenry began at 5:00 a.m. on the morning of September 13, as a young lawyer named Francis Scott Key watched the red glare of the British rockets, the bombs bursting in air over the Fort and wrote a poem about the flag that was still flying over the fort after a siege of three days and nights. The British gave up the siege and retreated, the Americans had held out, it was a heartening victory and a version of Key’s poem would become our National Anthem.

After the War of 1812 Francis Scott Key continued practicing law. He was the district attorney in Washington, D.C. until his death on January 11, 1843. He is buried at Mount Olive Cemetery in Frederick, Maryland. “The Star-Spangled Banner,” which Francis Scott Key wrote became our country’s national anthem in 1931.

Today, Tera Ruba (Latin for Red Earth) stands as a monument in honor of Francis Scott Key outside of Toms Creek in the small town of Keysville. The only monuments for their brave acts during the War of 1812 are the tombstones in which these soldiers of Emmitsburg sleep. In James Helman’s 1906 book A History of Emmitsburg history he lists those who are buried in the Cemeteries around the Toms Creek area and they are as follows:

  • Michael C. Adelsberger
  • Jesse Nusseur
  • Paxton Peter Remby
  • Capt. Jacob Row
  • Capt. Michael Sluss
  • James Storm
  • Felix B. Taney
  • John Wetzel

A personal note: While researching this article, I ran into two of my ancestors who fought in the War of 1812. Private Miller Junkins, died December 1, 1814 and Private John Durst who served in the First Rifle Battalion Maryland Militia. My mother has always told me Francis Scott Key is a relation in my family heritage.

 

STORY -JOHN MILLER